Avid vs. FCP

Welcome to the Avid & (vs.) Final Cut Pro articles and link archive.

avid_&vs_FCP_09

NOTE: This page was created in September 2006 to keep track of various Avid Media Composer vs. Final Cut Pro discussions around the web. Certain links may have expired over time or software updates to the applications may make the data either incorrect or irrelevant. Please keep that in mind as you peruse the links and as always download demos and use the software yourself (if at all possible) before you spend your own money.

As a user and fan of both Avid products and Apple’s Final Cut Pro, I love them both. I do not believe one to be better than the other contrary to what many other editors I have spoken with think. They are both great tools to achieve an end result. If I have the choice I will choose different tools for a different outcome and editing software is no different. Below are links to a series of articles I have been writing to look at Avid and Final Cut Pro, side by side, feature to feature, in more detail. These started back before Media Composer Software was available and before Avid discontinued Avid Xpress Pro. Most things apply to Avid Media Composer Software as well. The differences are many, but the similarities are there as well.

  1. Avid vs. Final Cut Pro. My Take. a quick comparison of a number of features
  2. Looking at the mortal enemies a comparison of some of the basic terms
  3. Recording audio keyframes a look at the process if audio keyframing and automation gain
  4. Looking at the Avid and Final Cut Pro timelines In depth with the basics of the timeline
  5. Comparing the Avid and Final Cut Pro capture tools Comparing some of the basic capture features
  6. Nesting in Final Cut Pro and Avid Xpress Pro They use the same term in both applications but “nesting” is quite different.
  7. Looking at the Avid and Final Cut Pro trim tools Mechanically they operate the very similar but the differences are vast.

At the Editblog on Pro Video Coalition I wrote The Basics of Avid Media Composer for a Final Cut Pro Editor and the follow up piece More Avid Media Composer for the Final Cut Pro Editor.

Some other resources from around the web:

Oliver Peter’s Final Cut vs. Avid Redux.

A little more on Avid vs. Final Cut a podcast from Creative Cow.

And of course there’s a discussion thread on Creative Cow about Avid vs. Final Cut Pro.

In 2006 Patrick Inhofer wrote One editor’s perspective.

Geniusdv.com’s nice side by side comparison.

I was part of a That Post Show discussion called A Market for Avid and Final Cut.

Avid2FCP: a website dedicated to moving from Avid to FCP.

Final Cut Pro to Avid: a website dedicated to moving from FCP to Avid.

Kevin McAuliffe wrote The Age old Debate: Avid versus Apple.

The California Video Production blog has a post about Avid vs. Final Cut Pro – The Battle in the Job Market.

Chris at latenite films has a detailed article about his thoughts on the two apps.

Eddie Hamilton, a UK editor, lists his thoughts on AVID vs FINAL CUT PROin a feature film cutting room.

The official Avid forums have many discussion threads. This thread called Avid MC vs Final Cut Pro … ready to jump !! is a place to start and find other Avid forum links.

There’s even an Avid vs. Final Cut Pro discussion video on YouTube though I’m not sure you can really get a lot of good info in 3:24.


18 comments to “Avid vs. FCP”

  1. Comment by Steve Mullen:

    You correctly say “If you want to move a clip you just click and drag it anywhere. … In Avid, if you want to move a clip around the timeline you must enter ‘segment’ mode.”

    I think understand the logic of the two Segment Modes. They let you MOVE a GROUP of clips together. But what drives mr crazy is you have to enter one of the Segment modes to:

    * Move ONE clip

    * Delete ONE clip. (True, a delete is a move. But in almost all applications any OBJECT can be selected via a click and deleted.)

    This is a huge FCP MC difference! Because the default mode is what I call Non-segment Mode, an editor moving from ANY other NLE to MC is going to try clicking, double-clicking, triple-clicking on a clip trying to select it. And, the high probability of getting the Do You Want Delete a Track?

    What makes this behavior worse is I’ve never found any use for the Non-segment mode — other than setting audio keyframes. One can move the playhead via the Monitor slider or the TC track. Moreover, logically, except in Trim Mode, one either has a Timeline that ripples or doesn’t ripple.

    Given this, it would be great to have a TIP on deleting:

    * What ways can one rapidly select a clip and ripple-delete it?

    * What ways Non-segment can one rapidly select a clip and non-ripple-delete it?

    * What ways can one rapidly select a GAP and ripple-delete it?

    * What ways can one rapidly select a GAP and non-ripple-delete it?

    * How can one delete something in a BIN rapidly. (Why isn’t the Trash always visible? Why no right-click delete?)

    Is there anyway to force MC upon opening to send itself a “v” keystroke for those of use who have no need of Non-segment Mode? In other words, IF THERE WAS A WAY TO HAVE MC OPEN WITH Extract/Splice SET — the timeline would behave much more like FCP.

    Thank you and good luck!
    Steve

  2. Comment by Scott Simmons:

    OK Steve …. here’s some answers: http://www.scottsimmons.tv/blog/2008/10/15/a-few-of-steves-avid-questions-answered/

  3. Comment by Tim:

    Why you would want AVID to behave like FCP is beyond me…? The way AVID is designed means that you can perform work on your timeline very FAST and without having to use the mouse – splicing and overwrite editing are very simple and intuitive and entering the two segment modes (red or yellow arrow) takes one keyboard stroke….

    As for the “non-segment mode” being useless – I think that is very far from the truth as it is great for navigating through the timeline, dragging a lasso around clips and for use in trimming. If you drag the mouse in AVID from left to right it automatically puts you in segment mode and selects the clips you have drawn a line around (you can use ALT key to enter this mode). Dragging from right to left puts you in trim mode automatically, useful for slip or slide-trimming…

    For me there is far more fundamental stuff that slows up the work rate in FCP – for example – in AVID I can set in and out points in the record monitor, and an out point in the source window… hitting the “Q” key will automatically work out where your source in-point would be without having to work out durations, etc. This is very useful if you need to end a clip at a specific place and need to check where the clip would begin. I think AVID has all sorts of useful short-cuts like this – which is what makes it so intuitive…

    Tim

  4. Comment by Neil Jacobs:

    Steve:

    If you are going to work on Avid you should really try to learn how avid does things. Avid has an infinitely more sophisticated and nuanced toolset. Trying to make Avid run like Final Cut Pro is like trying to make a Mercedes Benz run like a Ford Focus. It doesn’t make allot of sense and you are robbing yourself of the chance of learning a much richer toolset. It seems as if you may be predisposed to not liking Avid because you learned on Final Cut Pro. This is human nature. We praise what we know and cast aspersion on what we do not. No matter how many foreign languages we learn we always think in our native language. Always. That is why it is so intellectually dangerous to learn on Final Cut Pro. You are learning mediocrity and you will foolishly try to stick to these mediocre methods of editing and eschew any chance of learning a more sophisticated method out of instinct. Having a natural predisposition against something is the biggest stumbling block against learning and with out the appropriate knowledge you will never be able to be comfortable on an Avid. Forget everything you know about Final Cut Pro and learn anew when you use an Avid or just do not go there. Get out of all of this tribal non sense and consider yourself a storyteller and software merely as a tool. Be curious and try to learn ( because right now you don’t know shit, just sayin … no offense ) and you will be amazed at how much more powerful and intuitive Avid is. The fastest way to learn a foreign language is to stop trying to appropriate it’s grammar to your native language.

    Based upon your questions your knowledge base is extremely limited as it relates to Avid and you were even using final cut pro terminology to ask them. I would suggest going through the Avid manual page by page ( yes, it’s hard, that’s why it’s called work ) or just not using it at all to save yourself allot of frustration. And remember if it is not a media composer it’s crap. Also remember it takes about six months of daily use to even begin to wrap your head around Avid. It takes ten times as long to learn the Avid than Final Cut Pro because it does ten times as much. You can learn Final Cut Pro very quickly because it is essentially a toy in comparison. However long it took you to get comfortable with Final Cut Pro, that amount of time isn’t going to cut it on Avid. It would take longer to learn to fly the space shuttle than a single engine plane would it not? But if you are doing high end professional jobs and you are more than just a hobbyist or doing more than just low end jobs that pay less than $3000.00 per week ( minimum wage for anyone with true talent ) you should get that experience pretty quick.

    Now to answer your questions.

    This was your post and I will write responses beneath.

    You correctly say “If you want to move a clip you just click and drag it anywhere. … In Avid, if you want to move a clip around the timeline you must enter ‘segment’ mode.”

    Yes you do and for good reasons. Read the manual.

    I think I understand the logic of the two Segment Modes. They let you MOVE a GROUP of clips together. But what drives mr crazy is you have to enter one of the Segment modes to:

    * Move ONE clip

    * Delete ONE clip. (True, a delete is a move. But in almost all applications any OBJECT can be selected via a click and deleted.)

    Not correct. You do not have to go into segment mode even though it is only one button for crying out loud, you can actually lasso left to right and it will highlight the clip just like Final Cut Pro and let you delete it by hitting delete just like Final Cut Pro. No you cannot click and delete but you can lasso and delete. And there are VERY smart reasons for this which would take too long to get into but the more you learn the more you will understand why. Also remember that a lasso will take you into segment mode and clicking the timecode track will take you out VERY fast without having to hit a single button.

    This is a huge FCP MC difference! Because the default mode is what I call Non-segment Mode, an editor moving from ANY other NLE to MC is going to try clicking, double-clicking, triple-clicking on a clip trying to select it. And, the high probability of getting the Do You Want Delete a Track?

    Well that is their problem. If they are not willing to unlearn themselves and relearn themselves in a new and more sophisticated context than maybe they have too rigid of a mind to be a good storyteller in the first place. Also, Avid is the best editor on the planet and if you make the effort to master it you will know why. Avid is under no obligation to rewrite it’s software to make it more accommodating to Final Cut Pro Users just as a Mercedes is not obligated to put a shitty radio in their car to accommodate Ford Focus drivers who just fell into some money. And as far as money goes. Any show worth a damn can afford an Avid and any editor with talent can afford their own Avid. Poverty is a choice if the show is good and you are talented. You get what you pay for.

    What makes this behavior worse is I’ve never found any use for the Non-segment mode — other than setting audio keyframes. One can move the playhead via the Monitor slider or the TC track. Moreover, logically, except in Trim Mode, one either has a Timeline that ripples or doesn’t ripple.

    Slipping, sliding, trimming, collapsing, nesting, mixing, extracting, inserting, overwriting, lifting, compositing, keyframing effects, subclipping, multi-camera editing, copying, pasting are just some of the things you would not do in what you call non-segment mode.

    Also keep in mind that allot of the ways in which Final Cut Pro allows you to do things in the timeline like “all tracks forward” are really workarounds for not being able to do things in intelligent ways due to Avid’s lock on allot of patents. For instance. All tracks forward is basically there to make room for something that you want to move in it’s place like if you are moving an entire scene before another and what not. In avid, every time you make an extraction it appears in the clipboard monitor automatically. Just find what you want to move. Mark in. Mark out. Extract. Go to clipboard contents in the menu or better yet map it to your keyboard. Hit the yellow arrow where you want it to go. Done. In Final Curt Pro you have all of this move all of this forward stuff then close the gap or oh shit I didn’t make enough space so I over wrote stuff I should not have now I need to undo and make more space and then re paste close the gap yadda, yadda etc … Bullshit. You can get around this by selecting the area, hitting apple x, close gap then shift z it to place you want it to go but you still have to double razor the whole sequence for it to actually fall in as an insert without knocking out sync or going in as an overwite. Too many steps. Not intuitive. Also in the Final Cut Pro way of moving entire pieces you can only copy and paste everything you have selected. In avid it goes to the clip board as source and you can selectively chose what to insert or what not to insert and even selectively remap the tracks. You cannot do this in Final Cut Pro.

    If there is ever anything that you cannot do in Avid that you can do in final cut it basically means that Avid knows a smarter way and you would be all the better to learn the smarter way.

    Given this, it would be great to have a TIP on deleting:

    * What ways can one rapidly select a clip and ripple-delete it?

    * What ways Non-segment can one rapidly select a clip and non-ripple-delete it?

    * What ways can one rapidly select a GAP and ripple-delete it?

    * What ways can one rapidly select a GAP and non-ripple-delete it?

    * How can one delete something in a BIN rapidly. (Why isn’t the Trash always visible? Why no right-click delete?)

    It seems like you want to know the fastest way to get something out of the timeline correct? Just like final cut you select the area you want out and then either lift or extract. You do this with the mark clip button. Then you hit the lift button or the extract button. Two steps just like Final Cut Pro. Or you could lasso from left to right and hit delete for a lift. The reason Avid is only in segment mode when segment mode is selected is because the way it trims, slips and slides is initiated by lassoing areas and if it was always in segment mode it would select entire clips when you lasso as opposed to just the transitions. I would study the slip, slide and trim functions extensively in the manual and everything will make total sense to you. Knowledge isn’t free and you have to put in the hours and actually be investigative. Also, the slipping and sliding in Avid is light years ahead of what Final Cut Pro considers slipping and sliding which is too extensive to get into but do yourself a favor and study it. Also the trim tools in avid are more advanced because of the way it handles sync in a much more intuitive way, especially the way it handles concentric trimming while in a transition corner display. Also in Final Cut Pro there are allot of extra steps that you have to make when single roller trimming your A side forward if you have a continuos audio clip under it. You have to double razor the entire sequence at the trim point or you will get “operation not allowed ” but in the avid you only need to have one edit selected and you can trim it forward and it will actually break whatever you have underneath automatically and bump everything down while maintaining sync. Less steps. More intuitive. Also keep in mind that in final cut pro when you want to make a ripple delete which is called an extraction in Avid you have to have every track selected that will be rippled in the track panel. In avid you only need one track selected to make and all tracks extraction. Because Avid is smarter software it assumes that if you want to make an extraction you obviously want to extract all tracks beneath therefore keeping everything in sync therefore requiring only one track to be selected which is allot less steps and allot less unnecessary clicking like in Final Cut Pro.

    So basically Avid must reserve it’s “non segment” mode to make sure that during a lasso it selects the transition and not the clip. If you have no use for non segment mode than you are not making the effort to truly learn the Avid or utilize it’s advanced features that Final Cut Pro does not have. Without making this effort you will always be frustrated and frankly and “uneducated” and an “unskilled” user. Who the hell wants that? Put in the hours my man and it’ll all click. Bottom line you do allot of lassoing in Avid. If you are not in segment mode you are lassoing transitions in order to go into slip, slide or trim mode and if you are in segment mode you are selecting entire clips to manipulate and if it was always in segment mode it would not know what to select and therefore you would not be able to lasso transitions and you would actually have to select tools like in Final Cut Pro which is far less intuitive than just a drag of the mouse.

    As far as deleting something in the bin. Select it and hit delete. Done. Now you do not want to rapidly delete something. That is not cool. You want the option window that avid gives you. It gives you the opportunity to delete the audio or video or both. Also it can allow you to delete just the clip or just the media or both. Final Cut Pro is extremely limited in that it let’s you delete the entire clip from the project but not simultaneously from the media drive and does not allow you to separate audio from video when deleting which actually does become useful in some situations.

    Is there anyway to force MC upon opening to send itself a “v” keystroke for those of use who have no need of Non-segment Mode? In other words, IF THERE WAS A WAY TO HAVE MC OPEN WITH Extract/Splice SET — the timeline would behave much more like FCP.

    No. And there is no reason to want to do this if you learn way avid trims, slides and slips. And remember, if you insist on working the same way you learned than a lasso in Avid is the same as a click in FCP. And like I said above, trying to make one piece of software behave like another probably means you are too rigid minded to be a good storyteller, at least when dealing with verite based material.

    I could go on with all of the things that Avid can do that Final Cut Pro cannot but that would be an essay unto itself. I am trying to answer your questions only.

    Bottom line. Based upon your last post your knowledge base of Avid is EXTREMELY limited. There are only two kinds of Avid editors. People who know all there is to know and are aware of the fact that it is the best editing software on the planet and people who do not have the patience for the higher learning curve, end up learning only ten percent of it’s true functionality, get frustrated because they have not mastered the tool and walk away not really knowing how limited their knowledge base is and talk about how much they hate it. The English language is the hardest in the owlrd to learn but the most powerful. See any parallels?

    Also I should say that I have been editing for twenty years and have edited probably over one hundred hours of television on Avid and about thirty on final cut pro. I know everything there is to know about both and have no preference. But I also know wassup with the differences ….

    Good luck to ya …

  5. Comment by MIke Lyle:

    The whole AVID/FCP argument is so ld it’s ridiculous. Both platforms are extremely valuable in capable hands. That being said there are countless “computer operators” out there claiming to be editors, yet they have never spent 10 minutes in chair or working behind someone with 25 years experience teaching them about things like timing and continuity. In my experience Avid MC is a hands down favorite for any scripted show with 4 camera’s or less. With it’s new auto scripting function it is EVEN better than before. Unfortunately very few people make use of this great tool. In Avid you have much better media management and stability as well as the ability to do damn near EVERYTHING on the keyboard and across multiple video and audio tracks at one tie.

    In Final Cut pro you have a better set up for 90% of the crap that is on T.V. today. Run and gun guerrilla style film making. where everything is done and delivered out of the box.

  6. Comment by David Lewis:

    I’ve been looking over the comments posted and they are all very good and informative. YET, I am in a situation that hasn’t been addressed… AVID MC and FCP quality digitizing.

    Background: I’m a director/editor who has been editing on an AVID XPress for several years. I recently was called in on a project using a mac computer and FCP (started January 09). It took awhile, and though I still feel more at home with AVID, I have found FCP to have some easy aspects… such as being able to automatically lay an image over another by opening up another video track and laying in the item… as far as I know (I have NOT cut on the MC) in AVID the upper layer is the only image you see (unless perform a key)… if I’m wrong, I’d love to know about it, as it makes my next choice easier.

    So the question is… I am now about to buy my own editing system (have been hired out for up unti now). I really love using a Mac OS and want to buy an IMAC 24″ computer…. I dont’ know if i want to run AVID or FCP on the system…. first of all, FCP Studio is still less expensive than AVID MC. Then, what do I do about digitizing. What do I need to digitize DV or BETA or even VHS/DVD material into my system? Will the IMAC have a graphics/video card good enough to digitize in material? I’m only now begining to work with HD material… so far msot fo the work has been DV/Betacam or Digitbeta work (fire wired into the mac or when using the AVID, the old Mojo) .

    If I go wtih AVID, do I have to buy there MOJO ($8,000 item) to digitize DV, VHS/DVD or Beta SP/SX into an IMAC? Same question for FCP, what do I need to digitize… wil the internal graphics/video card in an IMAC be sufficient?

    I’d appreciate your feedback… as it goes now, even though my work-place has me editing on FCP, I’m leaning for taking AVID home with me.

    All the best,

    David Lewis
    DCL Productions

  7. Comment by David Lewis:

    Just acouple of comments as I re-read some of the comments,

    Picture “framing”- The ease of re-sizing and moving (including “straightening”) pictures in FCP is amazing. Don’t know if AVID MC has added an easy feature like that, but in the past to straighten a crooked photo meant an effect (PIP) and a render. FCP takes a simple approach to “wire-frame” the image and allow you to manipulate it.

    Secondly, regarding AVID /FCP trim.

    I admit I may need to give it more time, but I still have troube with the “ease” of FCP edit trim. For me the AVID trim edit mode works terrific. It is very intuitive, clearly set up on the screen allowing accurate viewing the edit. In FCP I found it not as user-friendly (as a reminder, I’ve been editing on an AVID for years and only the past 9 months have worked on a FCP). Especially problematic for me is the “slip/slide” (AVID terms) in FCP It just doesn’t work right for me… hard to explain but the set-up and action just isn’t as intuitive or as easy to use as the AVID. Although I know they are both good systems, and FCP was created… if I understand correctly from AVID techs, something abuot the AVID still seems to work better… at least for me.

    As many have noted, bottom line is they are both workable and quality NL edit systems. Each with pros/cons and it depends on the editor’s needs, experience and style with which system works best for the editor.

    David Lewis
    DCL Productions

  8. Comment by Scott Simmons:

    David, IMHO an iMac just doesn’t cut it for professional editing. Yes you can run FCP on an iMac, and probably Avid too. Not sure if Avid supports an iMac or not. But on both you will be limited to a firewire interface. The new Avid Mojo DX box uses a PCI card so that won’t work at all. Neither will an AJA or BLackmagic card. You could get an AJA IO HD but you will still be pushing the iMac’s graphics processor. As more apps begin to integrate the Open GL of Snow Leopard this might be more of an issue. Go with a Mac Pro (yep, they are expensive) as they are a workhorse machine.

    As for FCP’s trim …. it’s light years behind the Avid Trim Mode. But the flip side for many is how easy you can click and drag and trim directly in the FCP timeline. It’s deciding which is better for you and your work. Me? I have both and use both depending on the job.

  9. Comment by Josh Vargo:

    David, while Scott is right that the tower is a far more professional piece of equipment however not everyone has an unlimited budget. I own a Mac Pro tower and an iMac 24.

    I purchased the iMac first and added the tower when I could afford it. Guess which I use 90% of the time. The iMAC. As long as you keep the iMac cool it has more than enough power to run FCP or After Effects. The real upside to the iMac is the Monitor. for 2k you get a totally capable machine with an impressive color and Gama accurate monitor. I am guessing that you wont have a 3k broadcast HD monitor for color correction so a Spyder3 and the iMac monitor will provide wonderfully accurate results.

    Bottom line is your clients will not know the difference in the end result and if digitizing is a concern pick up an AJA IO SD on ebay for like 400 bucks.. works like a charm if you are not ingesting HD plus gives you quality audio as well.

    Downside is everything is on Firewire so if you do HD its only gonna be DVCPRO HD or Apple Pro Res HD and you will grow quite a collection of ext hard drives. My advice on that is back up back up back up.

    I guess my point is you won’t be making a mistake with either system but you have to decide how important that extra 2 grand is to you right now. I have never used AVID on an IMAC but i am guessing its less taxing than After Effects… I will render all night long for weeks at a time on both machines and the IMAC almost always keeps up with the Pro Tower.

    The Pro Tower is way faster on Adobe Media Encoder for some reason….

    Just thought I would lend my two cents maybe you do have an unlimited budget if so go for the dream machine…

  10. Comment by S Simmons:

    That’s not bad advice Josh but I would add that a system like this that you are planning to do broadcast editing and color correction on needs that external client monitor. To calibrate an iMac and expect that to give you a proper color grading isn’t going to be that. You just can’t only monitor your FCP Canvas and get a true representation of what you final program will be.

  11. Comment by Alejandra Fitzsimons:

    Neil, fcp is no ford focus

  12. Comment by Steven Crichton:

    I have to say any program is merely a tool. That is it.

    So far my AVID time as a user is tiny in comparison to FCP and I have committed 100% to using it after speaking to editors in the field I’d like to work in. (AVID still rules the film orginated roost with the great metadata control … read the issues that murch had on cold mountain with syncing).

    As a pro-photographer I’m in a similar position of what software and where. To be honest I have found as with any image based thing the choices are endless. Photoshop is not the be all and end all remember! You choose the one that suits. For stuff I shoot in film that is silverfast with PS as a quick retoucher and spotter. And for digital Nikon Capture with 99% of the work being done in it with no loss of time.

    Looking at the two editors as a fresh user, look at it in the sense of, do you want to learn as a career, does it meet YOUR requirements and can you justify ACTUALLY buying it. (the number of pirate users who bitch about software is plain offensive) After this you learn it inside out and then as previously mentioned,, you consider yourself as a story teller over an editor. Once the technology is transparent, that is where your talent comes through. A feature can as easily be assembled on an imac with iMovie (yes it has been done) as with an AVID full on maxed out system with enough outboard gear as you can muster, but the two could be exactly the same if the editor is not creative enough to breath life into the footage.

    Anyway, that’s my 2 cents.

    I would like to say, thanks Scott for some good insights and thanks for answering Steve’s questions. These have been invaluable to me as well.

    Steven

  13. Comment by raaa:

    AVID dominates in every creative aspect. I’ve been? cutting on both FCP and AVID since the early 90′s.
    I reluctantly agreed to allow a feature film to stay on FCP; big mistake. Creatively FCP caused the edit to take at least 25% longer. Changes took 200-500% longer.

    FCP is immeasurably more costly if creativity, making changes, and efficiency are your priorities. It’s for projects with with beginners doing the layout and early work — but you lose every $ you save, and worse: creativity.

  14. Comment by Bobby F Dowd:

    Hi all, I too am an early Avid Certified Editor, and I have been editing on Avid since 1993. The entire Avid vs. FCP is literally an Academic discussion. Early on Avid would not discount it’s product to colleges and universities. Saying, to paraphrase an old SNL skit, “We don’t care we don’t have to, we’re Avid.” This lead the educators of future media professionals to purchase FCP, which did offer a discount. Then, once these “brainwashed” FCP graduates worked their way up to a management/purchasing position, well… naturally they chose what they knew, FCP. Never being exposed to the Avid product. Avid made a BIG mistake!

    I agree with raaa…. Avid is the superior product, having had nearly 30 years of actual Editors “tweak” the program to perfection. That being said, FCP is an “OK” product, if your a computer geek, think like a computer geek and edit like a computer geek. After all FCP was de-engeneered from Avid by computer geeks, who just did not and do not really understand why Avid works the way it does.

    I am now out of the business, after many years in the edit bay as a “predator,” that’s a Writer/Producer/Editor. I now teach Media Studies at a university level, and the residual effects of Avid’s worst decision ever still lingers. I hope to change this and open the eyes of administrators that insist “we don’t teach button pushing.” WRONG!

    BfD

  15. Comment by xian:

    Hi everyone

    I have been in Tv for like 30 years (in distribution) and now am producing and overseeing some programs.
    To know a bit more and continue learning, I wish to have more hands on experience myself when talking to editors…what should I learn FCP or AVID, help! and wh one more than another

    thanks

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